Author Archives: Peter Cameron

About Peter Cameron

I count all the things that need to be counted.

A week in Vienna

Last week, in the second week of Spring break in St Andrews, I was in Vienna, giving a course of lectures to the PhD students, at the invitation of Tomack Gilmore, a Queen Mary undergraduate now finishing his PhD with … Continue reading

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A scary evening

The picture is of Tommy Flowers, who built Colossus, the first computer. It was built to break the German High Command’s Fish cipher (Sägefisch) in the second world war; its construction would be regarded as heroic or despicable depending on … Continue reading

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The ADE affair, 6

Earlier this semester, we had a beautiful seminar by Pierre-Philippe Dechant, whose work has thrown some entirely new light on this beautiful work of art. I would like to explain a bit about this here. For more details, see his … Continue reading

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Conference announcement

The organisers have asked me to advertise this event, which I am happy to do The closing date for reduced rate registration is at the end of March. Please think about coming! Conference in honour of Peter Cameron / abstract … Continue reading

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Not what it seems

There are many outstanding books explaining the latest developments at the frontiers of theoretical physics to general audiences. This is not an easy thing to do, but the physicists who have stepped up tend to be very good writers and … Continue reading

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Algebraic properties of chromatic polynomials, 2

My paper with Kerri Morgan on algebraic properties of chromatic roots (described here) has just appeared in the Electronic Journal of Combinatorics: you can find it here. I won’t say any more about it, except to pose a challenge which … Continue reading

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Polynomials taking integer values

This is not a hot new result, just part of general mathematical culture. If a polynomial f(x) has integer coefficients, then its values at integer arguments are clearly integers. The converse is false; the simplest example is the polynomial x(x−1)/2. … Continue reading

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