Category Archives: geography

Places, maps, speculation

Around All Hallows Eve

A few things to note, at this very autumnal time of year. On Saturday we went to a concert, part of the St Andrews Voices festival. The concert was given by Dowland Works (five singers including Emma Kirkby, and two … Continue reading

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The Fife Coastal Path

A week or so ago saw for me the end of a journey that had been in progress for more than twelve years. I first walked a stretch of the Fife Coastal Path (St Andrews to Crail) on the free … Continue reading

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Diversions

These days I travel fairly often on the East Coast Main Line between London and Leuchars (for St Andrews). Last spring, for one journey they had announced when I made the booking that the train would leave Kings Cross 13 … Continue reading

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The Wendover Arm

On New Year’s Eve, I walked along the Wendover Arm of the Grand Union Canal. This turns off the main line of the Grand Union at Bulbourne and runs to the small Buckinghamshire town of Wendover. I started at Tring … Continue reading

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Two excursions

Last Friday, my friend Jan Kratochvil spoke to the Edinburgh Mathematical Society at the University of Stirling. I decided to go and hear him. The situation he talked about was typefied by this example. Suppose that you have a large … Continue reading

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Lunardi’s landing place

The first flight in Scotland was made by the Italian balloonist Vincenzo Lunardi, on 5 October 1785. Early balloonists had no control over their vehicles, and on this occasion the wind took him from Edinburgh, over the Firth of Forth, … Continue reading

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Magus Muir

In St Andrews, the ruins of the Cathedral and the Castle (the Bishop’s Palace) still stand unrestored. The ruins date from the Scottish reformation in the mid-sixteenth century; the castle was ruined by successive battles between Catholics and Protestants, whereas … Continue reading

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